Surgery

General Anesthesia

For some procedures, your pet will need to be administered a general anesthetic so that he or she will be unconscious during the procedure. Many pet owners worry about their pets being administered general anesthesia. Although modern anesthesia is generally quite safe, there is always a risk when undergoing a general anesthetic. To further lower any risk, we perform a physical examination on all pets under going surgery. We also offer (and highly recommend) running pre-anesthetic blood work ahead of time to catch any underlying health issues. In addition, we follow a specific anesthetic protocol, including a veterinary technician monitoring vital signs during the procedure, to minimize that risk as low as we can.

We begin most general anesthetic procedures by administering a sedative to help the pet relax and decrease any anxiety and pain. The next step is to put in an IV catheter which allows us to put them on IV fluids to maintain their blood pressure and give us access in case we need to give any medication before,during or after the procedure. We then administer an intravenous drug to provide complete anesthesia and place a breathing tube into the patient's trachea (windpipe). To maintain the state of unconsciousness, we deliver a gas anesthetic in combination with oxygen through the breathing tube. We have multiple types of anesthetic monitoring equipment as well as our veterinary technicians to monitor them throughout the procedure and during recovery.

Some surgeries that require a specialist, such as orthopedic surgeries, we do not do at this clinic. Check out the referral surgeries tab for more information on those.

Please contact us if you have any questions or concerns about your pet receiving general anesthesia or about the procedure for which your pet is scheduled.

Local Anesthesia

If your pet is having a minor surgical or diagnostic procedure performed, we sometimes use a local anesthetic to block feeling from a specific area. For example, for some small biopsies (depending on the size and location of the lump as well as the temperament of your pet), we can perform with local anesthetic and sedation. Local anesthetics cause a loss of sensation in the area where the procedure is being performed. We sometimes use a sedative in combination with the local anesthetic to keep pets calm during a procedure.

Please contact us if you have any questions or concerns about your pet receiving local anesthesia or about the procedure for which your pet is scheduled.

Referral Surgeries

Some of the more complex surgeries, such as orthopedic surgeries, we do not offer at our clinic. We work with the local referral clinics to provide your pet with the best veterinary care. The links below are the two more common veterinary hospitals we send referrals to.